Program Implementation

Fact Forwards helps local programs succeed…

We address adolescent reproductive health with a variety of approaches across South Carolina and beyond. Our partners across the state are a vital component in reaching high-risk youth in South Carolina. These partners include community-based organizations, school districts, health centers, college campuses, and social service agencies, among youth-serving entities.  We fund a variety of programs in all regions of the state so that these groups can be innovative in their implementation of research-proven programs.  

Want to know more about how we work in your community? Contact us for more information. 

Current Initiatives

Orangeburg School District:

 

  • Since 2016, over 4,400 middle and high school students have been reached through the Expanding Reach initiative in Orangeburg County School Districts.
  • Ninety percent of students “strongly agreed” or “agreed” that having a baby as a teenager would make it harder for them to reach their future goal.
  • Eighty-two percent of students correctly answered, “You can tell if someone has an STD/STI just by looking at them.”
  • Eighty-seven percent of students are “more or much more likely” to be able how to correctly use a condom.
  • Seventy-five percent of students stated they are “more or much more likely” to be able to say “no” if a boy/girl put pressure on them to have sex when they don’t want to as a result of program participation.”

Anderson County DHEC:

  • Anderson County Health Department has provided the clinic-based intervention 17 Days and reached over 130 youth in the past year. Most of the youth indicated they liked watching 17 Days.
  • Based on post-survey results, 87% of youth demonstrated high self-efficacy about planning to use a condom and refusing to have sex without one as a result of the program.
  • Over two-thirds (77%) of youth participants they are “more or much more likely” to be able to say “no” if a boy/girl put pressure on them to have sex when they don’t want to as a results of program participation.”
  • Nearly all (98%) of youth stated it was important to use a condom even if another form of birth control is being used.
  • Eighty-three percent of youth stated as a result of the program, they are “more or much more likely” to use a condom (or ask partner to use) a condom.
  • A majority of Anderson DHEC survey participants stated that they had heard of all methods of birth control, although they had lower knowledge about the IUD (like Mirena or ParaGard), Patch, and the Ring (Nuva Ring). Most stated that as a result of the program, they were “more or much more likely” to use or have partner use one of the birth control methods described in 17 Days.

Project RHEA:

  • In the first year of Project RHEA, over 200 college students completed the Media Aware program. Media Aware is an evidence-based, online program that leverages college students’ passion for pop culture to teach medically accurate sexual health information and behavioral skills to prevent sexual assault, sexually transmitted infections and unplanned pregnancy.
  • Immediately following the completion of the Media Aware program, post-survey results show that 90% of students were “somewhat familiar” or “very familiar” with IUDs after completing Media Aware and 93% of students were “somewhat familiar” or “very familiar” with implants after completing Media Aware.
  • Ninety-nine percent of students who completed Media Aware program believed “Yes” students need the information provided by the program. 
  • Condom access points and distribution on participating college campuses increased as a result of Project RHEA.

"Thank you so much! I'm glad I could participate, it really helped me become confident with my decision to get on birth control so thank you for that!"

-Program Participant

Aiken County Schools:

  • Nearly 5,000 students received an evidence-based intervention within Aiken County School District in the past year.
  • As a result of the program, high school students increased knowledge around STDs/HIV. Most (95%) of Aiken high school students correctly answered the question, “It is important to use a condom even if another form of birth control is being used” and over 90% correctly answered, “You can tell if someone has an STD/STI just by looking at them.”
  • Based on post-survey results, 74% of youth demonstrated high self-efficacy about planning to use a condom and refusing to have sex without one as a result of the program.
  • A majority of Aiken high school survey participants stated that they had heard of all methods of birth control, although they had lower knowledge about the IUD (like Mirena or ParaGard), Patch, and the Ring (Nuva Ring).
  • The majority of middle and high schools students felt that the material presented during the evidence-based programs were clear. 
  • Most youth in middle schools indicated that they had goals and plans for the future and having a baby as a teenager would make it harder for them to reach their goals
  • Eighty-three percent of middle school students believed people their age should wait until they are older before they have sex.
  • Younger youth in middle schools, 87% correctly answered, “You can tell if someone has an STD/STI just by looking at them” as a result of the program.

1A:

  • In the past year, nearly 200 teens in out of home care have received teen pregnancy prevention evidence-based programming, while over 50 youth within the juvenile justice system have received programming as well.